Evolutions in Scholarship

During June 2014...

Power of Open Access at work

Wednesday, June 11, 2014 4:05 pm

Today, a faculty member made my day.

In August 2013, Dr. Peter D. Weigl, Research Professor of Biology, applied to our Open Access Fund, seeking support for an article on temperate mountain grasslands accepted for publication in Biological Reviews. He wanted to make is work available OA, as he knew that his research would be of interest to policy makers, conservationists, and others beyond the normal readership of the journal. His fund application met our criteria, and he was successfully funded by three departments at Wake Forest University: the Z. Smith Reynolds Library, the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs, and the Department of Biology. His article, “Temperate mountain grasslands: a climate-herbivore hypothesis for origins and persistence,” co-authored with Travis W. Knowles, was first published online last October.

This morning, Dr. Weigl stopped by my office to let me know that his hopes in publishing his article OA were realized: because his article was openly accessible, he has made new research connections, and been invited to speak, including at a symposium in Oxford. He thanked me for the library’s and University’s commitment to Open Access, and to his research.

This is why OA works.

Confused about copyright? Coursera has a course for that

Monday, June 9, 2014 4:09 pm

This summer, three of my esteemed scholarly communication colleagues – Kevin Smith (Duke), Lisa Macklin (Emory), and Anne Gilliland (UNC) – will be teaching Copyright for Educators and Librarians. This course aims to provide an overview of U.S. copyright law “to empower teachers and librarians at all grade levels.” If you’ve ever wanted to know more about copyright, particularly if you’ve felt hampered in your teaching because you were fearful of copyright, I encourage you to sign up. I’m taking the course because I always learn something new when Kevin, Lisa, and Anne present, and because copyright is fun!


Categories
Digital Humanities Pedagogy
Digital Humanities Research
General
the-future-of
Tags
altmetrics blogging copyright fair use MOOC open access public access publishing research scholarly communication scholarship
Archives
September 2014
July 2014
June 2014
April 2014
January 2014
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
May 2013
February 2013
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
May 2012
February 2012
July 2010
March 2010
Subscribe
Entries
Comments

Powered by WordPress.org, protected by Akismet. Blog with WordPress.com.