Special Collections & Archives Blog

Author Archive

“Finding A Piece of History” in Wake Forest Magazine

Tuesday, March 11, 2014 11:08 am

We are so excited about the story published in Wake Forest Magazine on Friday! Read all about our discovery of a Philomathesian banner and our plans for it in the future in Kerry King’s article “Finding A Piece of History.”

The ABC’s of Special Collections and Archives: C is for…

Wednesday, February 12, 2014 11:23 am

C is for…

Casa Artom Scrapbooks

Casa Artom is a house, purchased by WFU in 1974, facing the Grand Canal in Venice, Italy. The two-story house was built in the 1820s and is located between the Peggy Guggenheim Museum and Ca’Dario. The house is named for Dr. Camillo Artom, a faculty member at the Wake Forest University School of Medicine, and his wife Bianca, a teacher of Italian and native of Venice. Wake Forest University students and faculty reside in Casa Artom while participating in the semester in Venice or other study-abroad programs.

Students at Casa Artom

Students at Casa Artom

The Casa Artom Scrapbook collection consists of 14 bound scrapbooks, including originals and facsimiles, in which students and other visitors have written their thoughts and reminiscences about their time at Casa Artom. Guests of the house are invited to sign scrapbooks during their visit as a way to record their time spent in Venice.

Page from Casa Artom scrapbook

Page from Casa Artom scrapbook

The scrapbooks range in dates from 1974 to 2007. You can find both photographs and original drawings by students and faculty in the scrapbooks. For more information, check out the Casa Artom Scrapbooks finding aid.

C is also for …Choate Family Papers

Excerpt from the Choate Family Papers

Excerpt from the Choate Family Papers

This collection of papers from the Choate family living in Alleghany County, North Carolina consists primarily of correspondence between William Thomas Choate (1832-64) and his wife, Martha (Fender) Choate (1836-97), during his service as an officer in Company I, 61st Regiment North Carolina State Troops during the Civil War. His letters are concerned with camp life, the Battle of Antietam, casualties, sickness in his company, and the need for food and clothing from home. His wife’s letters are mostly about the family and neighbors, deaths in the family and neighborhood, sickness, running the family farm, care of livestock, and her wanting William to come home. Other correspondents include William Choate’s brothers, friends, relatives and others. For more on the Choate Family Papers look through the finding aid and visit Special Collections to see the microfilm.

And C is for…Cranford by Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell

Title page from Cranford by Elizabeth Gaskell

Title page from Cranford by Elizabeth Gaskell

Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell was a British novelist and short story writer during the Victorian era. She was born in London in 1810 and died in 1865. She’s known for works such as Ruth, The Life of Charlotte Bronte, North and South, and Cranford.  Her novels offer readers details on the lives of many strata of English society including the very poor.  She framed her stories as critiques of contemporary attitudes and generally emphasized the role of women.

Biographical information on Gaskell

Biographical information on Gaskell

Cranford was a popular novel during the 19th century. First published in 1851 in serial in the magazine Household Words, Cranford is one of the best known novels of Elizabeth Gaskell. It was published in eight parts in Charles Dickens’ journal from 1851 until 1853. Cranford is different from the other novels by Elizabeth Gaskell in that it is the depiction of a small English village and is concerned with the everyday occurrences in the lives of mainly older ladies, rather than the story of a great social problem threatening the lives and security of the characters. Special Collections and Archives has two copies of this wonderful novel. Special Collections’ older copy was published in New York in 1892 and is a part of the Charles L. Smith collection. The second copy was published in London in 1935 and is one of 500 copies printed at the University Press, Oxford. To read one of these copies in the Rare Books collection, visit the Special Collections and Archives reading room.

And don’t forget to look out for D…

This ABC’s of Special Collections blog post was written by student assistant Brittany Newberry.

The ABC’s of Special Collections and Archives: B is for…

Wednesday, December 4, 2013 3:18 pm

B is for…

The North Carolina Baptist Historical Collection

The Biblical Recorder

The NC Baptist Historical Collection is one of the largest collections in Wake Forest’s Special Collections and Archives. This collection documents North Carolina Baptist churches, institution, and individuals. It contains various materials on Southern, Missionary, Primitive, African-American, Union, and Alliance of Baptist churches. It includes over 16,000 books, periodicals, association annuals, and other printed materials as well as church records, association minutes, and church vertical files. Patrons may also find more than 1,000 biographical folders containing information as well as photographs on Baptist pastors and Wake Forest alumni. This collection serves at a repository for records from North Carolina Baptist churches and institutions as well as for the Alliance of Baptists and the Woman’s Missionary Union of North Carolina archives. However, that’s not all someone can find in this collection. This collection holds a complete set of the print version of the Biblical Recorder, which is the official journal of the North Carolina Baptist Convention. It was published biweekly and in existence since 1833.
To see what else is in this expansive collection, check out the finding aid for North Carolina Baptist Historical Collection or the Ethel Taylor Crittenden Collection in Baptist History.

B is also for…Bill J. Leonard

Bill Leonard playing the carillon

Bill Leonard playing the carillon

Bill Leonard was the founding dean of the WFU Divinity School and is the James and Marilyn Dunn Professor of Baptist Studies. He is also a professor of church history, author of Baptist history writings, and an ordained Baptist minister. He received his education form Texas Wesleyan University, Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, Boston University, and Franklin College. He’s recognized for his work in American, Southern and Baptist religious studies and he is the author and editor of 17 books including The Fragmentation of the Southern Baptist and Baptist Ways: A History.
This collection includes some of his personal and professional papers, sermons, and research materials. It also includes research materials for books and lectures, professional papers and correspondence collected during his tenure at Southern Baptist Seminary, Samford University, and Wake Forest University. A major portion of the collection contains materials relevant to the controversy and split of the Southern Baptist Convention in the 1970s and 1980s. The collection also contains his correspondence files with letters from President Jimmy Carter, Walter Harrelson, James Dunn, Glenn Hinson, and many notable figures of the Southern Baptist Convention. There are also some audio recordings of his sermons as well as lectures by such prominent theologians as Jurgen Moltmann.
To find out more about this notable Wake Forest professor, check out the finding aid for Bill J. Leonard and visit Special Collections and Archives to see materials.

And B is for… “Bibi” by R.B. Cunninghame Graham (1852-1936)

Title page

Title page

R.B. or Robert Bontine was a Scottish adventurer, writer, and political radical. He was the son of a Scottish laird and a half-Spanish mother. He was educated at Harrow School and in Brussels. During his adult life he was a rancher in Argentina, a traveller, a socialist Liberal MP (1886-92), and in 1892 a parliamentary candidate for the Scottish Labor Party, a party that he was a co-founder of. He was also elected president of the National Party of Scotland in 1928. He published various works on Latin American history, stories on Scotland, and travel books.

Author's signature and notation that this copy is #251 in a printing of 250

Author’s signature and notation that this copy is #251 in a printing of 250

His short work “Bibi” is a rare find. A editor’s note in the work states “This edition of “Bibi” is limited to 250 copies, numbered and signed by the author” The copy that Special Collections and Archives holds also has a handwritten note underneath the editor’s note that reads “251. Out of series.” The work was published in London by William Heinemann Ltd. in 1929. The work includes a prologue and the story itself is only 19 pages long.

Prologue

Prologue

In this work, Graham writes an episode of the life of Bibi. Bibi is the son of an English family living in Tangier who becomes a follower of Islam. The story is a quick read and very intriguing, and also not the only work of Graham’s that you can find in the Rare Books collection.
To find out more about Bibi or to read more of R.B. Cunninghame Graham’s works visit Special Collections and Archives.

Stay tuned for C…

This ABC’s of Special Collections blog post was written by student assistant Brittany Newberry.

Collections of Hope: The University Archives Documents WFU’s Food Justice Efforts

Monday, November 18, 2013 11:00 am

Collections_of_Hope

Collections of Hope: The University Archives Documents WFU’s Food Justice Efforts
Tuesday, November 21, 2013, 4-5:00PM
Special Collections Research Room, Room 625
Z. Smith Reynolds Library

The Wake Forest University Special Collections and Archives is happy to announce that we are working in conjunction with representatives from Campus Kitchen, The Institute for Public Engagement, and the Food, Faith and Leadership Initiative to begin collections for these groups. Join us as we hear from Shelley Sizemore, Norma-May Isakow and Fred Bahnson about the projects that they have been leading and their hopes for future efforts. Light refreshments will be served.

Hawthorne Hill Treasures: Objects from the Wake Forest Medical Historical Archives

Thursday, November 14, 2013 11:40 am

hawthorne-hill-treasures-poster

Hawthorne Hill Treasures: Objects from the Wake Forest Medical Historical Archives
A Discussion with Dianne Johnson
Tuesday, November 19, 2013, 3-4:00PM
Special Collections Reading Room
Z. Smith Reynolds Library

Stop by for cookies and punch and a visit with Archivist Dianne H. Johnson–Dianne will discuss WFU medical school collections as well as how she selected the items currently on display in Special Collections & Archives.

New Finding Aid Online!

Thursday, October 31, 2013 9:27 am

Special Collections and Archives is happy to announce that the Harold Tedford Collection of Theatre Programs is processed and the finding aid is now online. This collection is one of many performing arts collections available in Special Collections & Archives. We will be publishing a guide to all of these collections soon, so stay tuned!

The ABC’s of Special Collections: A is for…

Thursday, October 24, 2013 11:06 am

A is for…

Archives Week! And a great way to start the ABCs of Special Collections and Archives.

Archives Week is an annual, week-long observance of the agencies and people responsible for maintaining and making available the archival and historical records of our nation, state, communities and people. –Society of North Carolina Archives

2013 N.C. Archives Week poster

The theme of the eighth annual archives week is: “Home Grown! A Celebration of NC Food Culture and History.” This theme offers a great way of looking at the food culture and history of Wake Forest University and the surrounding area as seen through various forms of archival materials. This year’s exhibit will feature materials from various offices and programs around campus, such as the Office of Sustainability, Institute of Public Engagement as well as various articles about Campus Kitchen. The exhibit includes materials from the University Archives and the Howler. Check it out this week: Oct 21-27th!

A is also for…Abbey Theatre

Abbey Theatre is a well-known theatre in Dublin, Ireland. It’s the national theatre of Ireland and was the first theatre to be state-subsidized in 1925. Founded by W.B Yeats and Lady Augusta Gregory, it first opened its doors to public audiences on December 27, 1904.  It was then located on Old Abbey Street, but after a fire in 1951 the original buildings were badly damaged and the Abbey Theatre was relocated Queen’s Theatre. However, in 1966 it moved back to its original site. Information on the revival of this theatre and various productions can be found in the Dolmen Press Collection, Liam Miller Personal Paper series. Liam Miller was a passionate theatre goer, who enjoyed live theatre. He helped to revive both the Abbey Theatre and the Abbey’s Peacock Theatre.

Stage design pamphlet for Abbey Theatre

Stage design pamphlet for Abbey Theatre

Interior of Abbey Theatre pamphlet, written by Liam Miller

Interior of Abbey Theatre pamphlet, written by Liam Miller

Abbey Theatre program

Abbey Theatre program

Verso of Abbey Theatre program

Verso of Abbey Theatre program

"A Comedy in Three Acts"

“A Comedy in Three Acts”

And A is for…Archibald Cree

Archibald Cree, a Baptist minister from Scotland, moved to North Carolina and served several Baptist Churches in places such as Macon, Littleton, Jackson, and Vaughan, North Carolina. Within the Archibald Cree Papers collection, you can find biographical and genealogical info, speeches, sermons, and even a diary that he kept on his trip to Switzerland in 1878. You can also find a wooden box that contains his shoemaking instruments. Another collection found in the archives is his sermons. You can find in this collection seventy-two hand-sewn sermon booklets. Each includes the date or dates that each sermon was preached and some even have the hymns that were used from the Spiritual Songster.

Sermon on Micah, written by Archibald Cree

Sermon on Micah, written by Archibald Cree

Sermon on Peter

Sermon on Peter

These events and collections are only a small part of what can be found in Special Collections and Archives, be on the lookout for B…

This ABC’s of Special Collections blog post was written by student assistant Brittany Newberry.

N.C. Archives Week!

Wednesday, October 23, 2013 10:35 am

Archives Week exhibit

Archives Week exhibit

It is Archives Week in North Carolina! This year’s theme, “Home Grown! A Celebration of NC Food Culture and History” provides a wonderful opportunity for institutions across the state to highlight materials in their archives as well as create local connections.

Here at ZSR, our student Brittany put up a small exhibit in the entrance-way that contains some archival materials It also has brochures, posters, and other materials from food-related campus initiatives. Soon we will be partnering with Campus Kitchen, the Office of Sustainability, and the Food, Faith, and Religious Leadership Initiative to establish collections and schedule events. Stay tuned!

Hawthorne Hill Treasures: Objects from the Wake Forest Medical Historical Archives

Tuesday, October 1, 2013 12:08 pm

hawthorne-hill-treasures-poster

Hawthorne Hill Treasures: Objects from the Wake Forest Medical Historical Archives
October-December 2013
Special Collections Research Room, Room 625
Z. Smith Reynolds Library

Featured Collection: David Needham Gore Papers

Thursday, September 26, 2013 2:42 pm

This Featured Collection post was written by Paige Horton, student assistant in Special Collections and Archives.

The David Needham Gore Papers (MS192) is a small, but worthwhile collection housed amongst hundreds of larger collections in Personal Collections & Manuscripts. We should all know by now not to judge a book by its cover or a collection by its size. Small, but mighty the David Needham Gore Papers house biographical information, sermons, personal correspondence, and Cape Fear Baptist Association Notes that speak to his work as a missionary. This collection offers a unique view into the late 19th century in North Carolina.

David Needham Gore was not only a Wake Forest College graduate but he was also a much loved and highly successful North Carolina pastor. Born in 1835 in Columbus, North Carolina, Gore dedicated his time to serving his community through his church. According to Baptist Biography Data Form, housed in Folder 1, Gore was a pastor at County Line Baptist Church in Turkey Creek, Louisiana and also a missionary to Ogbomosho, Nigeria, in West Africa for several years. He was also the first pastor of the Piney Forest Baptist Church after it organized in 1869. Gore was pastor for two periods: 1869-1875 and then again from 1877-1879. He also led in the organization of the Sunday school for the church in 1871. Reverend Gore was “greatly loved and respected by the members of the church.”

The great debate about this collection comes in the form of the Civil War. In his biological information there is a reference to Gore being Captain to the 18th Regiment in 1861. When our librarians researched this they found no mention of a David Needham Gore who served from North Carolina in the Confederate Army. In his Biography data it also says that he served as chaplain and that was also found to be inconclusive. What we do know about Gore comes from his biography information but also the rest of the collection including sermon notes, the personal correspondence, and the Association notes.

The entirety of his personal correspondence is addressed to one Miss Mary Rockwell of Whiteville, North Carolina. The correspondence, dated from 1879 to 1881, is well preserved and offers an exciting look into the everyday life of a 19th century pastor. The Association notes also hold interesting bits and pieces about Gore as a pastor. He was an Itinerant for the Southern portion of the Cape Fear Baptist Association in 1860; while he was Itinerant, he “traveled for 56 days, preached 93 sermons, received 65 persons, and baptized 46…[and his] traveling expenses [were] but $1.80.” Maybe the most surprising fact out of all of that is that he only spent $1.80 for 56 days of travel! The Association notes hold many more pieces like this in which Gore’s missionary work is detailed out.

The collection is full of interesting and surprising details just like the ones listed above. To access the collection students can view the finding aid to get a brief overview or make an appointment with the Special Collections to view the collection.


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