Special Collections & Archives Blog

In the 'Digital Projects' Category...

Digitized Reel to Reels Now Available Online!

Wednesday, August 7, 2013 9:31 am

The collection's logo

Special Collections and Archives is very excited to announce the completion of another digital project The University Archives Audio Recordings Reel to Reel Collection. You may remember some previous posts where we mentioned working on this collection. The new online digital collection is just a small selection of the larger reel to reel holdings within the University Archives. The finding aid for the collection shows to wide range of reel to reels that have yet to be digitized. Many thanks to our students for creating metadata. A very special thank you to Barry Davis for getting this into DSpace, and for being awesome in general!

Wake Forest Commencement Programs are online!

Tuesday, May 28, 2013 4:53 pm

The Special Collections and Archives department is happy to announce that the Wake Forest Commencement Programs are now digitized and available online! We took our programs to UNC-Chapel Hill to be scanned as part of the Digital NC project. These are some of the most requested items in our collection and are a great help in finding graduates’ names, who spoke at commencement, what dates commencement was on, and how many people graduated in a certain year. People can now search these programs to see what the originals look like and find the information they need. While not a complete collection, we have a bulk of the programs from the early years until present. We are excited to have this group of materials available online now to further help researchers with their inquiries.

Catalogues and Bulletins of Wake Forest are now online

Tuesday, April 10, 2012 12:22 pm

 

We are happy to announce that the Wake Forest Catalogues and Bulletins are online! Thanks to the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center for doing the scanning and to Vicki Johnson for organizing and transporting the bulletins. Varying titles and binding made this project no easy feat, but the benefits far outweigh any challenges this project may have presented. As of now, you can access the titles through the Special Collections and Archives page by clicking on the Howler Yearbooks under Popular Resources.

Biblical Recorder microfilm now online and searchable!

Tuesday, November 15, 2011 5:35 pm

The Wake Forest University Special Collections and Archives department is pleased to announce that the Biblical Recorder microfilm is now online and searchable! Thanks to a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services under the provisions of the federal Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) as administered by theState Library of North Carolina, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources, our microfilmed issues of the Biblical Recorder from 1834-1970 weredigitized, made searchable, and put online. This resource is one of our most highly used collections, and we are proud that it is now more accessible.

The Biblical Recorder is the official journal of the North Carolina Baptist Convention. Thomas Meredith, and early pastor who was instrumental in the formation of the state convention, founded the newspaper under the name of the Baptist Interpreter. The name was soon changed to the Biblical Recorder and Journal of Passing Events, and ultimately shortened to theBiblical Recorder. Readers can trace trends in social, cultural and religious views from 1833 until now, and gain a better understanding of how Baptist practices and attitudes have changed over the years.

The Biblical Recorder staff and Board of Directors in Raleigh were supportive of this effort from the beginning, and featured an article in their recent issue that will inform all current readers of the new resource as well.

We have already had a lot of positive comments and feedback from researchers who have used the online resource, as well as inquiries as to how the project took shape and what the process was from beginning to end. We are excited to have this available online, and eventually hope to have the funding to complete the remaining film from 1971-present. Please explore the site.

Max and Gertrude Hoffmann Music Manuscript Collection now online

Friday, October 28, 2011 1:44 pm

This post is also available on the Library Gazette.

The Max and Gertrude Hoffmann Music Manuscript Collection is finally complete and available for use. With 170 titles represented in various levels of completion, we anticipate this collection to be a delight to musicians, composers, and anyone interested in vaudeville orchestration. These music manuscripts are only a portion of the larger Max and Gertrude Hoffmann papers (MS608) that includes posters, scrapbooks, photographs, and correspondence.This was a very large processing and digitization project and we are thrilled to announce the completion.

 

Findable finding aids!

Wednesday, December 22, 2010 3:32 pm

Finding aids for collections from the Department of Special Collections & Archives are now fully search- and browse-able through a new interface!

Check out zsr.wfu.edu/findingaids to see features including:

  • A look and feel like the ZSR website
  • Fully searchable contents, including container lists
  • Browse by keyword and title
  • Collection summary at the top of each finding aid
  • Linked finding aid sections
  • Linked keyword index
  • Expand/collapse container lists
  • Complete box and folder information

Kevin Gilbertson pushed the limits of the traditional finding aid by incorporating his sense of design and prioritizing user needs, creating a new interface for the finding aids on Dspace with XMLUI (the rest of our collections currently use JSPUI). Kevin’s creativity and willingness to understand the priorities of archival description helped him use XML to develop a finding aid interface that is one of a kind.

We invite you to experiment with the search, browse, and container list features. The search box is also featured on the Special Collections & Archives homepage. We are so proud to create greater access to the outstanding archival resources of ZSR!

Who Is Ruth Pritchard, B.A.?

Tuesday, November 2, 2010 2:49 pm

I have made a very interesting discovery while accessioning the 1937 Howler “markup” from Charlotte Engraving Company, Charlotte, NC. Perusing the hairstyles and facial expressions of the male graduates of the senior class of 1937, I came across the angelic face of a young woman, Ruth Pritchard of Wake Forest, North Carolina. According to the Wake Forest website, women were not admitted until 1942, but as can be seen in the recently digitized 1937 Howler pg. 41, women (including a Junior named Helen Bryan, pg. 49) were showing up in yearbooks before the shortage of men during World War II. Can anyone shed more light on the appearance of women in pre-1942 yearbooks?

Theater Actor Prints & Photographs Now Online!

Friday, October 29, 2010 7:57 am

Doris Keane in

We are proud to announce the Theater Actor Prints and Photographs Collection, representing early stage and film actors and actresses, performers, directors, and royalty from the 1880s through the 1930s. The collection includes engravings, etchings, prints, cabinet photographs, cartes de visite, and other photographic materials from England and the United States. The collection includes actors such as H.B. Irving, Fanny Davenport, Lillian Russell, and John Drew.

Images are from the Harold Seton Collection (MS578), the Harold Tedford Collection (MS580), the G. Sykes Collection (MS579), the Clarence Herbert New Papers (MS577), and the library’s collection of theater actor prints (MS581).

This collaborative project is the result of many contributors, including Rebecca Petersen, Craig Fansler, Megan Mulder, Barry Davis, Erik Mitchell, myself, and others.

Looking for Lanneau Pt. 1

Wednesday, October 20, 2010 5:27 pm

Finding the Seige of Wutang, 1926.

I’d like to try to build on earlier scanning work done with the Sophie Lanneau materials in order to bring into DSpace a bona fide “digital collection.” To that end I spent about an hour in the stacks today with one of our student assistants, Paige, trying to find viable content. I was especially interested in finding examples of Lanneau’s published and/or public writing because I felt it would be a good way to quickly build some context around the photographs that have already been scanned. There are hundreds of handwritten letters, which present a very long road to context and metadata.

Here is a photo and a poem I found in the already-scanned Lanneau materials. Lanneau copied down the poem written during the Communist siege of Wutang (1926), translated it and interpreted it. I find it moving how Lanneau takes pains to capture the Chinese meanings and render them fully to English readers.

Poems written by Wang Mei's father during the Siege of Wutang, page 1 of 2.

Photo among Lanneau Papers Box 4 folder 152

[New Zealand] Evening Post, Volume CXII, Issue 77, 28 September 1926, Page 9

SIEGE OF WUCHANG

CITY IN DESPERATE STRAITS,

PEKIN, 27th September. ….Wu Pei Fu continues his retreat. He is now Tegarded as a negligible quantity. The anti-Red campaign is almost solely in the hands of Sun Chuan Fang. Wuchang, besieged for twenty-seven days, holds out, but its resistance is dwindling on account of Wu Pei Fu’s retreat and inability to relieve the city. Twenty-two foreigners are unable to escape. There has been no communication with them for four days. The promise of the opposing armies to release 50,000 or 60,000 women and children has been withheld at the last moment. This is due to the defending general sheltering behind their presence, as the Beds refrain from a heavy shelling of the city, involving the slaughter of non-combatants. Meanwhile, the civilians are dying on all sides of starvation. Soldiers are commandeering the food.


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