Special Collections & Archives Blog

In the 'General' Category...

The Clarence Herbert New and Robert Warrington New Papers finding aid is now available online!

Thursday, June 28, 2012 3:53 pm

Special Collections and and Archives is thrilled to announce that the Clarence Herbert New and Robert Warrington New papers have been processed! You are able to access the finding aid online and explore the extensive and varied collecting habits of both Clarence and his son Robert. The Clarence Herbert New collection of Theater actor cabinet cards is a large portion of the digital project  Theater Actor Prints and Photograph Collection. In addition to cabinet photographs, C.H. and Robert New collectively contributed over 120 boxes (over 100 linear feet) of materials consisting of manuscripts, film posters, travel photographs, maps, scrapbooks, research materials, correspondence, art, and prints. It is well worth taking a look at the finding aid to simply read the biographical note on C.H. New. He led a very interesting life that included around the world travel, shipwrecks, and losing his arm to a bear in a New York City zoo! Not to mention his fame as the writer of “Diplomatic Free Lance,” which some critics have called the longest novel ever written. This is a tremendously interesting collection and we hope that researchers find the New’s appreciation for collecting and asset to their research.

Two New Finding Aids Available Online!

Thursday, June 7, 2012 3:13 pm

Special Collections and Archives is pleased to announce the online publication of two new finding aids! The Bill Leonard Papers and the Wake Forest UniversitySchool of Divinity Collection have been processed and the findings aids are available online. These two new additions, as with the rest of our published finding aids, can be found at our Special Collections webpage. Researchers both on campus and off are encouraged to browse our collections online and make an appointment to access the materials.

Special Collections and Archives in “The Academic Archivist”

Wednesday, April 18, 2012 10:30 am

The Society of American Archivists College and University Archives Section Winter 2012 newsletter, “The Academic Archivist“, includes news from ZSR! Section III, News from our colleagues, highlights the completion of the Gertrude and Max Hoffman Papers finding aid, The Gertrude and Max Hoffman Music Manuscript Collection, as well as The Biblical Recorder project. What a thrill to see some of our completed projects featured in the national newsletter!

Catalogues and Bulletins of Wake Forest are now online

Tuesday, April 10, 2012 12:22 pm

 

We are happy to announce that the Wake Forest Catalogues and Bulletins are online! Thanks to the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center for doing the scanning and to Vicki Johnson for organizing and transporting the bulletins. Varying titles and binding made this project no easy feat, but the benefits far outweigh any challenges this project may have presented. As of now, you can access the titles through the Special Collections and Archives page by clicking on the Howler Yearbooks under Popular Resources.

What are you working on?

Wednesday, February 15, 2012 9:57 am

Lindsey has been working in Special Collections for two years now and we couldn’t be luckier to have her. She is currently working on the tremendous “Bio File” project that includes creating a finding aid and digitizing thousands of biographical files. This is a highly used collection and will be a great online resource when it is completed. Lindsey is also one of two students working to transcribe and make available the finding aids for over a thousand church record microfilms (CRMF) that we have in our collection. This is a very important project and we couldn’t do it without Lindsey’s dedication and attention to detail. Thanks to Lindsey and all of the student assistants, we couldn’t do it without you!

Found in a Rare Book

Monday, December 12, 2011 12:11 pm

Party scene

We found a very interesting photograph in a book undergoing repair last week. The scene is a 1930′s vintage cocktail party- held somewhere in London. On the reverse of the photo is a stamp from the processor which reads: A.V. Swaebe, Society & General Press Agency, 11 Mitre Court, London. A note on the reverse of the photo, written in pencil reads: “At a party of C.R.W. – Nevisons R.R. smiling at M.F.” The photo itself is one of a society party where the party goers are reveling and talking. Everyone is dressed to the nines! This photograph was found inside: Men and Memories, Recollections of William Rothenstein 1892-1900 (ND497 R85 A27 1931). The inscription by the author reads: “For my dear John with whom I have spent some of the happiest hours of my life – Will Rothenstein Jan-1932″

reverse of Party scene photo

What Are You Working On?

Tuesday, November 15, 2011 4:15 pm

Today’s “what are you working on?” post features another of our hard working and dedicated student assistants, Nate. In his second year of service in Special Collections and Archives, Nate can be found on any given day assisting Beth in rare books, digitizing manuscript collections, or generally being our “Jack of all trades.” Today he is working on helping relocate hundreds of linear feet of church and biographical files for our upcoming construction.We appreciate all of the hard work Nate and all of the student assistants do for us, we would not be a success without you. Thanks, Nate!

Max and Gertrude Hoffmann Music Manuscript Collection now online

Friday, October 28, 2011 1:44 pm

This post is also available on the Library Gazette.

The Max and Gertrude Hoffmann Music Manuscript Collection is finally complete and available for use. With 170 titles represented in various levels of completion, we anticipate this collection to be a delight to musicians, composers, and anyone interested in vaudeville orchestration. These music manuscripts are only a portion of the larger Max and Gertrude Hoffmann papers (MS608) that includes posters, scrapbooks, photographs, and correspondence.This was a very large processing and digitization project and we are thrilled to announce the completion.

 

Formulation : Articulation, by Josef Albers (1972)

Friday, October 14, 2011 12:33 pm

If one says “Red” (the name of a color)
and there are 50 people listening,
it can be expected that there will be 50 reds in their minds.
And one can be sure that all these reds will be very different.

Josef Albers, Interaction of Color (1963)

 

The artist Joseph Albers (1888-1976) was born in Germany and began his career as an art teacher, painter, and printmaker. In 1920 he enrolled in the new Bauhaus School in Weimar, where he studied under color theorist Johannes Itten and began to formulate his own theories about the perception and interaction of color. Albers eventually joined the Bahaus faculty and remained there until the Nazis closed the school in 1933. He and his wife, the artist Anni Fleischmann Albers, left Germany for Asheville, North Carolina when Black Mountain College offered Albers a teaching post. While at Black Mountain Albers became influential in the American art world as an artist, color theorist, and art teacher . He remained at the college until 1949, when he left to become head of the Design Department at Yale.

Color remained Albers’s main preoccupation in both his art and his teaching. He emphasized the changeable nature of color, demonstrating how color perception is affected by light, shape, motion, and juxtaposition of other colors. In 1963 he published Interaction of Color, in which he set forth his ideas about the teaching of color theory and provided plates, many of them interactive, for use in classroom settings.

Formulation : Articulation, a collection of 127 silkscreen prints of Albers’s works, was published in 1972. Albers himself selected the works and arranged their order.

The preface to Formulation : Articulation states that

The concept of this publication is the realization rather than the reproduction of the essential ideas in Josef Albers’ works. . . . No attempt has been made to present the work in chronological order; rather, for each portfolio the artist has placed the folders in a sequential order so that they may be seen and examined for their interaction. . . .

Albers collaborated with Yale colleagues Norman Ives and Sewell Sillman to design the book and produce the silkscreens, a process which took nearly two years. The finished product, published by Ives and Sillman in cooperation with Harry N. Abrams, consists of the plates and a booklet of notes by Albers, all contained in two large portfolio cases.

Below is a sampling of images from Formulation : Articulation, with Albers’s notes on each print or set of prints.



I : 25

From oil of 1940, Bent Black. On tiptoe and pendant between points.

 

I : 26

Repeated and not repeated.

II : 8

ON MY HOMAGE TO THE SQUARE

Seeing several of these paintings next to each other makes it obvious that each painting is an instrumentation of its own.
This means that they are all of different palettes, and therefore, so to speak, of different climates.
Choice of the colors used, as well as their order, is aimed at an interaction- influencing and changing each other forth and back.
Thus, character and feeling alter from painting to painting without any additional “hand writing,” or so-called texture.
Although the underlying symmetrical and quasi-concentric order of squares remains the same in all paintings — in proportion and placement — these same squares group or single themselves, connect and separate, in many different ways.
In consequence, they move forth and back, in and out, and grow up and down and near and far, enlarged and diminished. All this, to proclaim color autonomy as a means of a plastic organization.

II : 18

A rare palette for a Variant in six colors. See the color interaction, particularly the illusionary transparencies within the grays.

 

II : 19

A quartet within an Homage to the Square which permits and deserves reversal — and, although reversed, the two remain twins.

Two original paintings by Albers– one of which is part of hisHomage to the Square series –are on view through December 31 at Reynolda House Museum of American Art as part of the special exhibit Modern Masters from the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Z. Smith Reynolds Library’s copy of Formulation : Articulation is number 705 of 1000 copies printed. It was purchased by the Special Collections Department in 1986.

Select bibliography of works by and about Josef Albers in the ZSR Library collection:

Albers, Josef, and Francois Bucher. Despite Straight Lines. New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 1961.

Albers, Josef. Interaction of Color. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1963.

Albers, Josef., and Casa Luis Barragan. Homage to the Square: Josef Albers. Mexico, D.F.: Casa Luis Barragan, 2009.

Danilowitz, Brenda., Josef Albers, and Josef and Anni Albers Foundation. The Prints of Josef Albers: A Catalogue Raisonne, 1915-1976. New York : [Lanham, Md.?]: Hudson Hills Press in association with the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, 2001.

Pakay, S., Weber, N. F., Albers, J., Albers, A., et. al. Hudson Film Works (Firm), & WMHT (Television station : Schenectady, N. (2006). Josef and Anni Albers: Art is everywhere. [Hudson, NY]: Hudson Film Works.

 

 

What are you working on?

Tuesday, October 11, 2011 10:45 am

 

Meet Chelsea Hosch. The face of the Special Collection and Archives reference desk on Tuesday and Thursday mornings, Chelsea has been doing excellent work! She is working on inputting Biographical Files into Archivists’ Toolkit and scanning all of the images in these files for a long term, highly anticipated digital project. Chelsea is a sophomore, but this is her first year working in Special Collections and we are so happy that she has joined our team. She has also helped tremendously by adding additional information to the Tribble Presidential Papers, allowing staff and researchers to find materials more quickly. Thanks to Chelsea and all of our student assistants for their fantastic work!


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