The last time I went to Chicago during the winter, I came back with my first case of bronchitis. ALA Midwinter was the second time I experienced a Chicago winter, and I’m proud that I carried out my duties as Secretary of the Asian/Pacific American Librarians Association (APALA) despite getting sick the day before the conference. I took an early Friday morning flight and attended the ACRL International Perspectives on Academic & Research Libraries Discussion Group Friday afternoon. There were three presentations:

  • “As a librarian at Salem State University, Zach Newell worked with a group of faculty to successfully write a grant to bring a group of Iraqi Fulbright Scholars to study at the University in the summer of 2014. Working with the group, he identified effective teaching strategies related to diversity, multiculturalism and social justice.
  • Thanks to special grant funding made available to campus units through University of Cincinnati’s five-year diversity plan, UC Libraries started special library programming for international students.
  • Laurie Kutner ran an ALA sponsored trip to Costa Rica in the summer of 2014. The 13 librarians from all over the U.S. worked on 3 different library projects in the Monteverde area of Costa Rica and contributed a total of 200 hours to these projects.”

The convener’s notes and presenters’ PowerPoint slides are posted here at ALA Connect.

I started my term as Secretary of APALA after the last ALA Annual Conference in Las Vegas, and I have been meeting with the Executive Board virtually on a monthly basis. It was great to see the other Executive Board members at an in-person meeting on Friday evening, and I also met a couple of ALA Presidential candidates.

On Saturday morning, I participated as a member of the ACRL Science & Technology Section (STS) Continuing Education Committee meeting. It was great to catch up with other science librarians and plan the science librarians’ breakfast for ALA Annual in San Francisco. I am also serving as Co-Chair of the APALA Archives and Handbook Task Force, and I led the APALA Committees Working meeting on Saturday afternoon. The revision of the APALA Handbook is one of the President’s priorities this year.

On Sunday morning, I attended an informative program sponsored by the ALCTS Linked Library Data Interest Group thanks to Lauren Corbett. The first part of the program focused on VIVO, which is an open source semantic web application that enables discovery of research and scholarship across disciplines in an institution. Seven institutions originally participated in VIVO in 2009, and Brown, Cornell, and Duke are also current participants in VIVO, which aims to build a large web of data, greater than any one effort. If you’re interested to learn more about VIVO, go to vivosearch.org and Indiana University’s VIVO site.