Last week, I drove up to Bethesda, Maryland to present at the Lilly International Conference on Evidence-Based Teaching & Learning. If you interested, you can view my presentation below.

Although I have attended a regional Lilly Conference in the past, this was my first time attending the international conference in Bethesda. My proposal was accepted after a blind review process, and I’m happy to report that my 50-minute concurrent session was rated 4.67/5 stars. Special thanks to Megan Mulder, Kyle Denlinger, and Molly Keener for serving as guest speakers for my LIB220 course last spring.

I received a useful sliding card of Bloom’s Cognitive Taxonomy with Outcome Verbs mapped to Assessment Questions and Instructional Strategies, which will be helpful in planning library instruction. Feel free to drop by my office if you’d like to see it.

Among the concurrent sessions and plenary sessions that I attended, I learned about the National Implementation Research Network, which endeavors to bridge the gap between research/evidence and practice/implementation to improve outcomes in the health, education, and social services domains. Another plenary speaker shared her insight that instructors can influence whether students adhere to a fixed mindset or a growth mindset. The instructor’s goal should be to encourage students to adopt a growth mindset to embrace challenges, be persistent to overcome obstacles, and learn from criticism. In contrast, if a student possesses a fixed mindset, then the student is more likely to avoid challenges, give up when encountering obstacles, and ignore criticism. Although I have used this teaching approach, this terminology/concept was new to me, and it reinforced that my teaching philosophy has been on the right track.

Overall, it was a worthwhile conference, which has inspired me to keep learning about pedagogical best practices. If you’re interested in talking more about pedagogy and instruction, I’d be happy to chat.