Due to the update of the ACS-approval guidelines of chemical literature instruction and launch of the new Biochemistry & Molecular Biology program, I took an early morning flight on Sunday Aug. 20th to National Airport and was immersed in 21 chemical information and chemistry education sessions over 4 days at the ACS National Meeting in DC. Although ACS policy restricts the sharing of information about their conference programs, I will share the titles of the sessions that I attended:

  • Supporting synthetic research with SciFinder-n
  • Getting a grip on STEM: Conducting a needs assessment of graduate student needs through focus groups
  • NSF Research Traineeship (NRT) Program: STEM graduate training and strong professional skill development
  • Expand career support for STEM graduate students with the Graduate Career Consortium
  • Career pathways and resources for professional development
  • PubChem: An open chemistry database
  • Implementation of optimum course content and key process skills in a one-semester undergraduate biochemistry course as preparation for taking the medical college admission test (MCAT)
  • Toxicity and adverse outcome pathways as a connecting concept between toxicology and undergraduate biochemistry
  • Strategies to deliver biochemistry content in general chemistry
  • Relating chemistry concepts to healthcare: Introducing cultural competencies in the lab
  • Molecular origami for biochemistry: Modelling protein-DNA interactions with paper models
  • Computers in medicinal chemistry – a toolbox approach to biochemical research and education: Understanding enzyme mechanisms
  • Simple approach for teaching 2D NMR to undergraduate biochemistry students
  • Development and quality matters assessment of an online preparatory chemistry course
  • Delocalized learning: Resonating with organic chemistry students in a Canadian university
  • Poor man’s electronic lab notebook
  • Comparative assessment of student learning outcomes of introductory chemistry course delivered via hybrid (blended) and traditional modalities
  • PubChem as a cheminformatics education resource
  • ChemIDplus at NLM: History and capabilities
  • For reproducibility, we need the methods behind the open data
  • PubChem as a biologics database

I was a first-time attendee and received a warm welcome from chemistry librarians from Northwestern, Stanford, UVA, and the University of Nebraska. For those who have been at ZSR for a while, I met up with Elisabeth Leonard who now works for the American Association for the Advancement of Science. I have returned with new ideas of course content, and I’ve already incorporated what I learned in my library instruction for chemistry courses this semesterĀ thanks to sponsorship from my BOLD Grant and partially from ZSR.