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  • 30 Years of Performing Arts: The Secrest Artists Series at Wake Forest University, 1983–2013 — The following is a guest post by Corrine Luthy, a graduate intern with Wake Forest University’s Special Collections & Archives. During the week of the first Secrest Artists Series event of the 2014–2015 season, Special Collections & Archives is pleased to announced the online exhibit 30 Years of Performing Arts: The Secrest Artists Series at Wake Forest […]

  • Worth a Thousand Words: Ken Bennett’s Photographs of ZSR — Special Collections & Archives is honored to host a selection of photography from University Photographer Ken Bennett. The exhibit will be up in the Special Collections & Archives Research Room (ZSR 625) through December 31st. Artist’s Statement: The photographs in this exhibit all have a common theme: they include the Z. Smith Reynolds library in […]

  • Buildings & Roads of WFU: A Student Perspective — Did you ever wonder who Jasper Memory was? Or want to know more about Bostwick Residence Hall? We have got the online exhibit for you! Special Collections & Archives is excited to release Buildings & Roads of Wake Forest University: A Student Perspective on our University’s History. This project started last summer when John Walsh, Class […]

  • Dream Big: Commencement at Wake Forest University Through the Years — Special Collections and Archives is honored to recognize the Class of 2014 with a new exhibit “Dream Big: Commencement at Wake Forest University Through the Years.” Commencement is the culmination of years of academic work, when Wake Forest graduates are recognized and introduced to the wider world. “Dream Big” is a visually dynamic exhibit featuring […]

  • Letters in Lead: Moveable Type and the Books It Created — The invention of a practical method for printing with moveable type was a watershed event in European history. From Johannes Gutenberg’s first metal types in the mid-15th century to letterpress printing of today, printers and type designers have practiced their craft to create texts that are both legible and beautiful. Letters in Lead, the current […]

—For more exhibits, see our Special Collections & Archives blog.

If you have any questions, please contact Special Collections & Archives at 336-758-6175.