Events & Classes

The Z. Smith Reynolds Library features a variety of events, workshops, and more. The library often partners with other units on campus to offer these programs. For more information, contact the library. Below is a list of upcoming events and classes.

  • Zoom
    OpenRefine is a free, open-source “power tool” for working with messy data. This workshop, designed for faculty and graduate students in the social sciences, will explore ways to use OpenRefine to clean and format tabular data efficiently. (Note that for virtual sessions, a Zoom link will be provided to participants prior to the workshop.)
  • Wise Man Brewing
    Come join supporters of the ZSR Library for some refreshments and Wake Forest history at Wise Man Brewing. There will also be a Special Collections & Archives popup exhibit on WF Athletics, focusing on the 50th anniversary of women athletes as well as 20 different beers on tap, including two local favorites, Mountain Calling and Body Electric. Pacific Rim food truck is on the schedule from 5-9 p.m. and Music Bingo starts at 7:30 p.m. This event is family-friendly. We will have special collections coloring cards for children, along with buttons, magnets, and stickers for all ages. Details and registration at https://go.wfu.edu/ybx/ . For further information, please contact archives@wfu.edu
  • [virtual]
    October 25, 2021 3:00-4:00 pm Register Here (Zoom link will be sent closer to the date) Title: Creativity, History, and Zines: A Conversation with Archivists Brief Description: Come join North Carolina Triad/Triangle archivists as they discuss the joy of zines--their construction, collection, and discovery as part of library collections, and what they represent for the communities and individuals who create them. Zines have long been a way for those marginalized by American society to have a voice of their own. They have played a special role for intersectional feminism, particularly in reproductive rights, the LGBTQ community, and civil/human rights. What is a zine? “A zine (/ziːn/ ZEEN; short for magazine or fanzine) is a small-circulation self-published work of original or appropriated texts and images, usually reproduced via a copy machine. Zines are the product of either a single person or of a very small group, and are popularly photocopied into physical prints for circulation.” Our speakers all have experience with making and collecting zines, and will share about their experiences. The panel will discuss the history of zines, collection development development issues, and community outreach. What do zines represent? How can you make them? What topics would you like to document in your zine creation? Panel participants: Lauren Brewer, Head Reference Librarian-High Point University Libby Coyner, Archivist and Assistant Librarian-Elon University Kelly Wooten, Research Services and Collection Development Librarian-Sallie Bingham Center for Women’s History Duke University (Zines as Primary) Sources. Moderator: Tanya Zanish-Belcher, Wake Forest University
  • ZSR Library, Room 665 (CAT Classroom)
    OpenRefine is a free, open-source “power tool” for working with messy data. This workshop, designed for faculty and graduate students in the social sciences, will explore ways to use OpenRefine to clean and format tabular data efficiently. (Note that for virtual sessions, a Zoom link will be provided to participants prior to the workshop.)
  • ZSR Library, Room 665 (CAT Classroom)
    Chances are there’s a mix of content created by you and by others that you rely on for your teaching. Beyond textbooks, your course materials might include lecture notes and slides, illustrated graphics, journal articles, video clips, and readings you’ve collected over time. There’s a mistaken belief that if you are using content for instruction, copyright doesn’t matter because any educational use is protected. Such blanket permission doesn’t exist, but there are ways to exercise copyright awareness with your course materials to ensure you’re within legal parameters. In this workshop, we’ll discuss how to think about copyright and course materials, how to assess fair use, and how you can leverage library resources and Course Reserves to stay out of legal limbo.
  • Zoom
    Digital tools for qualitative research help scholars organize, code, and analyze dozens of types of qualitative data, from texts to Tweets. Learn more about how MAXQDA can support your research projects with this introductory workshop. Open to faculty, staff, and graduate students. Each session is stand-alone and there are no prerequisites. (Note that for virtual sessions, a Zoom link will be provided to participants prior to the workshop.)
  • ZSR Library, Room 665 (CAT Classroom)
    Digital tools for qualitative research help scholars organize, code, and analyze dozens of types of qualitative data, from texts to Tweets. Learn more about how MAXQDA can support your research projects with this introductory workshop. Open to faculty, staff, and graduate students. Each session is stand-alone and there are no prerequisites. (Note that for virtual sessions, a Zoom link will be provided to participants prior to the workshop.)
  • Zoom
    Chances are there’s a mix of content created by you and by others that you rely on for your teaching. Beyond textbooks, your course materials might include lecture notes and slides, illustrated graphics, journal articles, video clips, and readings you’ve collected over time. There’s a mistaken belief that if you are using content for instruction, copyright doesn’t matter because any educational use is protected. Such blanket permission doesn’t exist, but there are ways to exercise copyright awareness with your course materials to ensure you’re within legal parameters. In this workshop, we’ll discuss how to think about copyright and course materials, how to assess fair use, and how you can leverage library resources and Course Reserves to stay out of legal limbo.
  • [virtual]
    History of Wake Forest Campus Style Thursday, November 18, 2021 at 3 pm. Online via Zoom Join Special Collections & Archives and the Wake Forest Historical Museum as we showcase campus styles over the decades. Featuring clothing, accessories, and photographs, we will highlight fashions and styles Wake Foresters have been sporting for decades. We hope you can join us for this fun virtual event! Register for this event › (Zoom link will be sent closer to the event)
  • [virtual]
    Author Ed Southern, Fight Songs: A Story of Love and Sports in a Complicated South Wednesday, December 1, 4:00 p.m. Online via Zoom Join author Ed Southern as he talks about his new book Fight Songs: A Story of Love and Sports in a Complicated South. Register for this event › (Zoom link will be sent closer to the event)
  • ZSR Library, Library Auditorium (Room 404)
    Named in honor of Hubert McNeill Poteat, who taught at Wake Forest University from 1911 to 1956 and was widely known and respected as a Latin scholar, this lecture series is designed to recognize and celebrate the many achievements of our faculty in research, scholarly, and creative work. The annual lectures are held each spring and are alternately sponsored by the Office of the Dean of the College and the Graduate School of Arts & Sciences. The 2022 lecture will be given by Dr. Simeon Ilesanmi, Washington M. Wingate Professor of Religion.