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Formal presentation: A Primer on Blended Learning (Donna Petherbridge, Traci Temple)

  • Very much an overview, but a nice general session
  • Student characteristics
    • Demand we-based ed, prefer some tech, expect faculty to use some tech
    • Net Gen & Millennials (lumped together when comes to interest in online learning)
    • Web interactions have lead to an expectation for interaction and input into what and how they’re learning
    • Students still say teachers are invaluable to learning; online education often means LOTS of email for instructor… because they still want access to expert
  • Blended Learning (lots of definitions)
    • Combining learning modes, teaching method/learning styles, teaching and learning strategies, learning in different contexts, and mixed approaches
    • Reduction in class time: refers to “Hybrid Learning,” not necessarily “Blended Learning.”
    • Mixed mode looks like: socialization group learning with learning possibilities of online environment
    • Student centered looks like: shift from lecture to student centered, new teaching strategies, teachers as facilitators, and focus on engaged instruction
  • Viewed on a continuum (Carol A. Twigg)
    • Supplemental Model (traditional with online elements)
      • Could be PowerPoint that you post online
      • Could be a podcast, blog, discussion board
      • Online quizzes
      • CDROM/DVD with rich, interactive activities, simulations, movies
    • Fully Online Model (majority/all instruction online)
      • Students can access course anytime, anyplace, with asynchronous meetings
      • Content available online; materials could have been created collaboratively with multiple faculty members focusing only on their areas of expertise
      • Assignments within context of LMS at own pace
    • Replacement Model (Blended Learning)
      • Can reduce number of meeting times
      • Technology-based instructional activities
      • In-person classes could remain same (or change)
      • Can work individually or in small groups
      • Activity based learning fosters critical thinking skills
      • At own pace
      • Learning materials can match students’ personal learning styles
      • Weekly quizzes replace homework grading (sound familiar?!)
      • Automatic grading and record keeping
      • Links to additional learning resources: streaming media, lecture notes, exercise
      • Instructors spend time responding to students’ questions and needs
  • Blended Learning Research
  • Examples
  • Benefits to students
    • Students like blended environment
    • Flexible course format
    • Active & student-centered
    • Greater interaction (student-faculty, student-student, student-content)
    • Part of learning process/learning communities
    • Serves varied learning styles
    • Increases learning outcomes
    • Better attendance, completion, and retention rates
    • Flexible, fits with “real life” family issues/work responsibilities, etc.
  • Institutional Interest
    • Increased student learning
    • More efficient classroom use, increases capacity of facilities
    • “Supersection” model (I can’t imagine we’d ever see this at WFU, but we do something like this at UNCG) More info, see: Hartman and Moskai
    • Issues for administrators
      • Classroom scheduling, technology needs, testing facilities
    • Institutional Questions
      • Accreditation, institution definition of BL, how listed in catalog
  • Overview
    • Blend “high-touch” with “high-tech”
    • Many different models
    • Will take time to develop courses